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Many World Splits

Everett's many worlds hypothesis [#!Everett:57!#] essentially states: whenever our universe's quantum mechanics based on Schrödinger's equation allows for alternative ``collapses of the wave function,'' all are made and the world splits into separate universes. The previous paper [#!Schmidhuber:97brauer!#] already pointed out that from our algorithmic point of view there are no real splits -- there are just a bunch of different algorithms which yield identical results for some time, until they start computing different outputs corresponding to different possible observations in different universes. According to $P^G,P^E,\mu^E,\mu^M$, S, however, most of these alternative continuations are much less likely than others.

In particular, the outcomes of experiments involving entangled states, such as the observations of spins of initially close but soon distant particles with correlated spins, are currently widely assumed to be random. Given S, however, whenever there are several possible continuations of our universe corresponding to different wave function collapses, and all are compatible with whatever it is we call our consciousness, we are more likely to end up in one computable by a short and fast algorithm. A re-examination of split experiment data might reveil unexpected, nonobvious, nonlocal algorithmic regularity due to a PRG.

This prediction runs against current mainstream trends in physics, with the possible exception of hidden variable theory, e.g., [#!Bell:66!#,#!Bohm:93!#,#!Hooft:99!#].


next up previous contents
Next: Expected Duration of the Up: S-Based Predictions Previous: Beta Decay
Juergen Schmidhuber
2001-01-09


Related links: In the beginning was the code! - Zuse's thesis - Life, the universe, and everything - Generalized Algorithmic Information - Speed Prior - The New AI